GIVE UBUNTU USERS BACK THEIR EXTENDED WARRANTY OPTIONS!

June 4, 2007

137 Votes

Status: Implemented

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I find it rather atrocious that Dell has decided to remove extended warranty options on all new Ubuntu systems. GIVE US BACK WHAT WE DESERVE!

If you want proof that Dell has shafted us, here it is:

http://digg.com/linux_unix/Dell_quietly_drops_extended_warranty_support_for_U...

DELL/ Status Update




This was an ordering system glitch (which is now fixed), for more details click here.



 

Comments Page (1 of 6)

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  • Sep 13, 2007     Comment Link

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    aikiwolfie: in fact i also use gnash on my solaris boxes and my ppc linux box. now i can watch youtube videos on every computer i own :)
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  • Sep 13, 2007     Comment Link

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    That's good news. Just what I wanted to hear. Well read. :o)
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  • Sep 13, 2007     Comment Link

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    aikiwolfie: gnash 0.8.x is a lot better than gnash 0.7.x (as found in feisty)
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  • Sep 13, 2007     Comment Link

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    I know exactly how to install stuff with Ubuntu. I'm just trying to determine the exact web browser and plug-in combination. Firefox with Gnash didn't work that well in Feisty Fawn. But they'll be the defaults in Gusty Gibbon. I've just down loaded the Dell remastered ISO. Maybe that'll make a difference.
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  • Sep 13, 2007     Comment Link

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    aikiwolfie: to install the proprietary flash plug-in in ubuntu click on system->administration->package manager, select the proprietary flash plug-in and click install. (while you're doing that, select whatever other pieces of software you want to install (i'm currently getting into blender myself), and then click install.)
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  • Sep 13, 2007     Comment Link

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    YouTube walked you through the installation? So what web browser were you using?
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  • Sep 12, 2007     Comment Link

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    akiwolfie: "... no legally sound way to play DVDs..." Of course there are legal ways to play DVDs on Linux - but I'll grant you they're not available on Dell's in the US. It's worth noting that the old IBM thinkpads pre-installed with Linux did have legally licensed DVD placyback through LinDVD . Current Toshiba's are also do legal Linux DVD playback through LinDVD technologies [reference from the same link above]. Internationally, though, it seems Linux DVD codecs may be legal in various countries. Personally, though I use my DVD player and TV for watching DVDs. Regarding Youtube - the flash player that installed by just clicking the default "yes" or "ok" or whatever buttons that YouTube walked me to worked fine. I do admit this area [licensed technologies like DVD playback and Dolby] is a shortcoming with Dell's current Linux offerings, though -- as well as a shortcoming with not enough commercial third party multimedia software. But they certainly are available.
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  • Sep 12, 2007     Comment Link

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    Well for a start I think the YouTube claim is a bit dubious. Gnash isn't officially supported until Gusty Gibbon comes along in October. I've tried the version that ships with Feisty Fawn and it was pants. Perhaps Dell has their own proprietary flash extension? Which web browser were you using? Was it Firefox or something else? Even if you did have videos working properly via YouTube that doesn't solve the problem of there being no legally sound way to play DVDs. In fact to play most of the popular video file formats on a Linux system we still have to use codecs intended for Windows. The truth of the matter is multimedia content playback on the whole is still pretty much a DIY affair in Linux. The fact of the matter is like most people I am not in the market for buying a PC for my mummy. I want a PC that I can use to do the things I want to do. Things like say build a media centre so I can keep everything in one place. I'd also occasionally like to take full advantage of the graphics technology when I'm playing games. Tux Cart just doesn't float my boat. Well actually neither does stock trading for that matter. Don't even suggest Myth TV as a media centre solution. Getting Dell involved with IdeaStorm is easier than getting Myth TV to work.
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  • Sep 12, 2007     Comment Link

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    @aikiwolfie: "So what software are we talking about here? Are you browsing YouTube at home with Firefox" That wasn't the software I was talking about - but indeed it worked with the Dell E1505N Dell shipped me. I think all it took was clicking "yes" on the "do you want to install the newer flash plugin" question that it asked me when I went to youtube. "What can the average consumer do with a Dell at home? Give us software titles. Tell us how you got it working. Tell us which distribution it works with?" Email (through gmail). Stock trading (through Schwab). Videos (through Youtube). IM with msn & yahoo & aol messenger users (through gaim). Deal with MSOffice documents (through openoffice). Out of the box, the Dell Ubuntu distro does everything my mom does on a computer. How did I get them working? The E1505N Dell sent me had these all working out of the box. What distro? Whatever Ubuntu distribution Dell included. Give an example what you think isn't ready?
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  • Sep 12, 2007     Comment Link

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    So what software are we talking about here? Are you browsing YouTube at home with Firefox and watching all the videos hassle free? If so let Dell know how you did it. Help them find the solutions to the problems they are facing. Take away the excuses for procrastinating and dodging the hard questions. What can the average consumer do with a Dell at home? Give us software titles. Tell us how you got it working. Tell us which distribution it works with? I like Linux as an OS. It's free, stable and secure. What I don't like is the constant bitching about how Dell is in Microsofts back pocket. It might be true but bitching doesn't help Dell find the solutions to the problems it faces when looking at Linux as an alternative OS to Windows. The simple fact of the matter is Linux right now isn't 100% ready to serve the consumer market for all the reasons I posted in my last post. The next Ubuntu release due out in October should take us a few good steps closer to that goal. But even then there will still be some work to be done before Linux can for the vast majority be their full time OS. It might be a hard pill to swallow. But the truth is Linux right now is not ready for the mass consumer market.

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